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Weddings

Fishermen’s Inn to reopen as event center in 2014

in Elburn/Regional/Weddings by
fishermansinn

Photo: Fishermen’s Inn in Elburn, closed since 2009, will reopen as an event center in 2014, featuring a silo that will serve as the main entrance. The Fishermen’s Inn building was purchased in October 2012 by Mark and Patricia Southern. Courtesy Photo

Restaurant has already booked 40 weddings prior to its grand reopening

by Natalie Juns
ELBURN—When Elburn’s Fishermen’s Inn closed back in 2009, the community lost a place where people could gather together for reunions, get-togethers, banquets and weddings. Five years later, Fishermen’s Inn is back with a completely updated facility.
Mark and Patricia Southern, the new owners of Fishermen’s Inn, purchased the facility in October 2012 with the intention of renovating it while still preserving its original barn style. The Southerns are accepting reservations for weddings and events, and already have 40 weddings booked for this year.
The Southerns plan to open Fishermen’s Inn to the public on certain holidays, but they aren’t sure of the specific dates just yet.

“We’ve been getting a lot of feedback on our website (fishermensinn.fishermensinnelburn.com),” Mark said. “People are excited that Fishermen’s Inn is reopening, but they think that it won’t be open to the public. We do want to include the community, and our plan is that we will be open on holidays for the public. We are hoping to open on Easter day to the public.”

There will be three banquet rooms in Fishermen’s Inn: The Veranda on the lower level and the Great Room and the Loft Room on the second level. The Great Room will be sided with historic barn siding from the Kane County area. Outlooking the Great Room, they will have a 3,000-square-foot brick patio bar that is expected to open the middle or later part of 2014.

Beyond the patio bar, there are interconnected brick pathways that wind up to the ceremony site behind the restaurant. In preparation of the weddings they will host, the Southerns last fall planted 20,000 tulip bulbs next to the ceremony site and by the pathways.

The Southerns are in the midst of building a silo that will be the main entrance from the parking lot on the west side of the building. The entrance will feature a curved circular ceiling with a sweeping staircase that will drop off visitors at the second level between the restaurant’s Great Room and the Loft Room.

Mark’s sister, Linda Hagen, and Patricia are managing the marketing, promoting and corresponding side of the new Fishermen’s Inn. Those who are interested in booking a wedding there can call (630) 365-9697 for more information.

“The word has spread, and we are looking forward to the grand re-opening,” Hagen said. “We are also thrilled to provide it and give back to the community this way. People will enjoy reliving their memories and creating new ones with their families.”

Sellers, Hartmann wed June 22

in Weddings by
Holly and Logan Wedding David and Step 622

Doug and Cathy Hartmann of Maple Park are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter, Holly, to Logan Sellers, son of Don and Gay Sellers of Earlville, Ill.. The couple wed on June 22 in Sycamore.

The bride’s maid of honor was her cousin, Megan Rowland. The groom’s best man was his brother, Derek Sellers. Holly and Logan’s bridal party included bridesmaids Ashley Hartmann, Lauren Collins, Katie Scott, Kady Shane. Groomsmen included Chase Sellers, Brad Iversen, Austin Mitchell, and Dan Hartmann. The ushers were John Collins and Alec Williams.

The bride attended Kaneland High School and graduated from University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2012. She is currently employed as a crop insurance agent.

The groom attended Indian Creek High School and is employed as a wind turbine technician in Shabbona, Ill.

The couple resides in Waterman, Ill.

Zabel, Shaw wed Aug. 4, 2012

in Weddings by

Rollin and Sara Shaw of Sugar Grove are pleased to announce the marriage of their son, Wayne, to Elizabeth Zabel, daughter of John and Marian Zabel of Simi Valley, Calif., on Aug. 4, 2012, at Rancho De Las Palmas in Moorpark, Calif.

The best man was Scott Pitstick of Springfield, Ill. The maid of honor was Victoria Zabel, sister of the bride, of Venice, Calif.

The groom is a 2001 Kaneland High School graduate, a 2005 graduate of the University of Illinois and a 2009 graduate of Aurora University, and is currently employed at Solar Turbines, a Caterpillar company in San Diego.

The bride is a 2001 graduate of Simi Valley High School and attended San Diego State University and Northern Illinois University, graduating in 2010. She is currently employed as a dietician at Rady’s Children’s Hospital in San Diego.

A reception for the couple was held on Sept. 8, at the Shaw family farm in Sugar Grove. The couple currently resides in La Mesa, Calif.

Hartmann, Dermody wed Aug. 18

in Weddings by

Doug and Cathy Hartmann of Maple Park are pleased to announce the marriage of their son Dan to Ashley Dermody, daughter of David and Laurie Dermody of Williamsburg, Iowa, on Aug 18, 2012, in North English, Iowa.

The best man was Nathan Fabrizius, friend of the groom. The maid of honor was Shelby Williams, friend of the bride. The rest of the bridal party was made up of the couple’s dearest friends. Dan’s sister Holly and Ashley’s brother Travis were also part of the bridal party.

The groom attended Kaneland High School and graduated from Iowa State University in 2010.

The bride also attended Iowa State University and graduated in December 2011. Dan and Ashley both studied agriculture at ISU, and are fulfilling their dreams by their employment in the farm industry. Dan is a swine production manager at Hartmann Farms Inc., and Ashley is a district sales manager for Beck’s Hybrids.

The couple resides in Cortland.

Fleck, Ackerman wed Aug. 11, 2012

in Weddings by

Gerald and Pat Fleck of Geneva are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter, Allison Marie, to Chad James Ackerman, son of Roger and Kathy Ackerman of Maple Park, on Aug. 11, 2012, at Mill Creek in Geneva.

The reception was held at Mill Creek. The maid of honor was Megan, friend of the bride. The best man was Christopher Ackerman, brother of the groom.

The bride is a graduate of Geneva High School and is currently employed at Geneva Care Center. The groom is a Kaneland High School graduate and is currently employed at Power Packaging.

The couple currently resides in Geneva.

Color cues

in Weddings by

by Tresa Erickson, MultiAd
You recently got engaged, and the excitement is brewing. You can’t wait to start the wedding planning. One of the first decisions you’ll face is selecting a color palette. There are so many shades to choose from. How do you decide?

While some brides have no trouble selecting a color palette, others struggle with it. The good news is that there are many facets from which you may take your color cues, starting with your color faves. What colors are you drawn to? Gold? Orange? Red? If you love red and can’t picture yourself getting married without it, then you have already won half the battle. All you need to do now is select one or two more colors, and you will have your palette. If the red is rather intense, you might opt for some neutrals like white, silver, black or gray.

Don’t have a favorite color? No problem. Look to your choices in apparel for your color cues. Start shopping for bridesmaid dresses, and once you select a style and color, take your cues from it. If the dresses are purple, you’ll want to make sure you work in some shade of purple into your palette. The same goes with the tuxes. If the groom has chosen gray tuxes, then you’ll want to make sure gray is either part of your palette or goes well with it.

Flowers also provide important color cues. What flowers are in season and what are you hoping to incorporate into your wedding? If you have your eye on a lot of pale pink blooms, then you will definitely want to work that color into your palette, or at the very least, choose a complementary palette.

Location and season can also provide color cues. Check out the venues you have selected for the ceremony and the reception. Do any of the colors there appeal to you? If you are getting married in a gazebo surrounded by yellow tulips, perhaps a cream palette with accents of maize and gold would work well. Season can also make a difference. Winter colors differ dramatically from summer colors. Maroon and silver might serve a November wedding well, but not a May wedding.

Still having trouble selecting a color palette? Consider current trends. A couple rounds of shopping should clue you in to these. Check out any supplies you might already have on hand, such as some tablecloths you borrowed from a friend who just got married. Think about all of the items you have selected thus far from the wedding dress to the wedding cake. If you’ve got a lot of ivory and cream going on, you might want to select a color that pops.

Keep in mind that just because you select a color palette early on doesn’t mean it will work. Be willing to make some changes the deeper you get into the planning. That pale green you chose for your accent color might turn into forest green once you select the invitations. Light green lettering doesn’t show up nearly as well on crisp, white paper as dark green does. Whether you choose the color palette or let it choose you, be open to change. You never know. That burgundy you’re hoping for might serve your April wedding better as fuschia.

The art of compromise

in Weddings by

by Tresa Erickson, MultiAd
You’ve seen enough to know that weddings can bring out the worst in people. Joining two people from different backgrounds in holy matrimony is rarely smooth sailing. What should be a union of two often turns into a union of families, and that can make for very difficult times. Even when the families take a step back to respect the wishes of the bride and groom, things can get out of hand. Although the wedding is theirs, brides and grooms can get carried away and alienate others with their wedding choices. How do you avoid this? You learn the art of compromise.

Compromise, a settlement of differences by mutual concessions.

That’s right. Differences and concessions. With so many people involved in the planning of a wedding, it is not uncommon for differences to occur. Whether concessions are made depends upon the willingness of the parties involved. Are you willing to consider options other than your own? Are you willing to consider that the options of others might be better? Just because you want round tables at your reception does not mean you should have them. They may not be available or work for the space.

Don’t assume there is one and only one way to do things. There might be several. You should take the time to listen to all of the options available before determining what is best for your purposes. Compromise cannot work without concession. It may be your wedding, but that doesn’t mean you have all of the best ideas. The more open you are to getting the feedback of others and pursuing what works, the easier the planning will be.

Of course, not all opinions are feasible. You must be able to separate the good from the bad, the essential from the non-essential, the important from the not so important. If an idea will not work, there’s no use in considering it. If an idea will work but you have your heart set on something else, it’s fine to axe it. It is your wedding, and you don’t have to concede on everything. Do remember, however, that your wedding will be just the first of many good days to come. The fact that you have to simplify the wording on the invitations for your parents’ sake probably won’t matter to you 10 years from now.

Respect is key. Family and friends must understand that it is not their wedding and respect the wishes of those involved, in particular the bride and groom. The bride and groom must understand that while it is their wedding there are others involved who may want to have a say. The couple must respect the opinions of each other and those involved in the wedding planning. That respect can lead to the willingness to concede, which in turn, can lead to a better wedding overall.

Amidst the madness

in Weddings by

by Tresa Erickson, MultiAd
Wedding just weeks away? Up to your elbows in planning? There is so much to do and so little time to do it in. Every bride needs a break now and then, if only to gather their thoughts and prevent themselves from turning into bridezillas. So, take a load off and check out this quiz on movie brides.

1) Toni Collette plays a wanna-be bride in the Australian film…
A) Maxine’s Wedding
B) Muriel’s Wedding
C) Marion’s Wedding

2) Jennifer Lopez falls for a guy whose
wedding she’s planning as…
A) Mary in The Wedding Planner
B) Charlie in Monster-in-Law
C) Paulina in Shall We Dance?

3) Molly Ringwald may play second
fiddle to bride Ginny in Sixteen Candles, but not in…
A) Pretty in Pink
B) The Breakfast Club
C) Betsy’s Wedding

4) Elizabeth Taylor raises paternal
concerns in Father of the Bride
as bride-to-be…
A) Ellie Banks
B) Kay Banks
C) Delilah Banks

5) Kimberly Williams plays the
bride-to-be in the 1991 remake of
Father of the Bride, but her character’s
name has been changed to…
A) Nina
B) Annie
C) Megan

6) Drew Barrymore plays Julia in The
Wedding Singer, a waitress who intends
to marry businessman Glenn but ends
up with wedding singer…
A) Robbie
B) George
C) Billy

7) Nia Vardalos shines in My Big Fat
Greek Wedding as bride…
A) Maria
B) Athena
C) Toula

8) Julia Roberts tackles the role of
bride in all of these films but…
A) Steel Magnolias
B) Runaway Bride
C) My Best Friend’s Wedding

9) Andie MacDowell stars in
Four Weddings and a Funeral as Carrie,
an American who weds Hamish
but ultimately falls for…
A) Charles
B) Angus
C) Bernard

10) Anne Hathaway and Kate Hudson
duel in Bride Wars as brides-to-be…
A) Fiona and Anna
B) Emma and Liv
C) Julia and Elliot

11) Debra Messing may play maid
of honor Kat in The Wedding Date, but she still manages to get the guy played by…
A) Jeremy Sheffield
B) Jack Davenport
C) Dermont Mulroney

12) Jennifer Alden plays a bride in
The Wedding Crashers, along with…
A) Isla Fisher
B) Rachel McAdams
C) Jane Seymour

Well, how did you do? Did you laugh a little at the thought of the hilarity that ensues in some of these films? Yeah? Good.

Answers:
1: B 2: A 3: C 4: B
5: B 6: A 7: C 8: C
9: A 10: B 11: C 12: A

Wedding cake alternatives

in Weddings by

by Tresa Erickson, MultiAd
You’re getting married soon, and the time has come for you to select a wedding cake. While you understand serving cake is tradition, you’re not real fond of the idea. Isn’t there something else you could serve? Of course there is!

There are so many alternatives to wedding cake. But before you start looking into them, you need to determine why you are opposed to the idea. Do you dislike the taste of cake in general or the look of a traditional wedding cake? If you like cake but not the standard tiered wedding cake with lots of frosting, you have many options. You can ask your baker to do something different and design you a unique cake, perhaps a replica of your wedding rings or favorite flower. You can serve smaller single-layer cakes in various flavors at each of your reception tables—this has become a big trend in recent years. You can fill several tierd platters with cupcakes of every flavor. The choice is yours, and if cake is not for you, there are alternatives.

Before you axe the cake altogether, remember your guests. Some will expect wedding cake and be sorely disappointed when you don’t serve it. For their sake, you might want to arrange for a small wedding cake. For those more daring, dessert options run the gamut from pastries to pie. Sit down and rank your dessert faves. Have your spouse-to-be do the same. Then compare the lists. Do you see anything in common? Perhaps ice cream is tops. No? Ice cream is your beloved’s number one choice and pie is yours? Pie and ice cream? What a great combo!

To give your guests more choices, consider serving your top choices buffet style. Arrange for an ice cream bar, for example, with several flavors of ice cream and toppings. That way, guests can create their own ice cream dishes from sundaes to banana splits. Instead of serving one type of pie, set up a pie bar with several types for guests to feast on. They might have a sliver of peach pie, a sliver of apple and a sliver of pecan. Still not sure what to serve? No problem. Set up a coffee and dessert bar with various sweets from pastries to puddings. This will satisfy a large number of sweet tooths.

There is so much you could serve in addition to or in lieu of wedding cake. Check out some bridal blogs and magazines, do a general search on the Internet and ask around. You’re sure to come up with hundreds of alternatives, so many in fact that choosing just one may be difficult.

Jakes, Palmer wed June 4, 2011

in Weddings by

Steve and Sandy Jakes of Elburn are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter, Carolyn Marie, to Brett Aaron Palmer, the son of Mary R. Palmer of West Chicago, Ill., on June 4, 2011, at Community Congregational Church in Elburn.

The reception was held at Lion’s Park. The maid of honor was the bride’s sister, Robin Jakes. Also in the wedding party were friends of the bride, Michealeena Cairo of Elmhurst, Ill., Kelsey Hodge of Madison, Wis., and Scott Thompson of Sugar Grove.

The groomsmen included the groom’s brother, Sean Palmer of Stamford, Conn.; John Norman of Chicago, John Bratencevic of West Chicago, Ill., and Patrick Grosser of Cincinnati, Ohio.

The bride graduated from Kaneland High School in 2006 and Elmhurst College in 2010. She is employed by Northwestern CUSD No. 2 in Palmyra, Ill.

The groom is a graduate of Community High School in West Chicago, Ill., and Elmhurst College in 2008. He is self-employed as a musician and music teacher.

The newlyweds live in Carlinville, Ill.

Oakes, Meyer wed in Jerusalem

in Weddings by

JERUSALEM—Everybody loves going to a wedding, but how about a destination wedding in the most famous city in the world?

This was the recent dream wedding of Tom Meyer from Elburn, and his lovely bride, Sarah Oakes from Minnesota. Not only were they married in this far away land of Jerusalem, but on the High Holiday of Shavuot in the Hebrew calendar—the day remembered by the Jews as when God married his people, Israel, after they came out of Egypt by giving them the Torah (the first five books in the Christian Bible) as the wedding ring or covenant on Mt. Sinai some 3,500 years ago.

This Shavuot Wedding has its anniversary on Pentecost, the day that the Church was born in Jerusalem some 2,000 years ago.

Outside, the Jerusalem sun was hot, and shade was only to be found under palm trees; inside the ancient walled city, Christ Church was brightly lit as the ancient white stone offset Sarah’s gleaming white, fine linen gown. The intense purple of the bridesmaids’ dresses, like King Solomon’s fantastic chariot in the “Song of Songs,” ensured that those in attendance didn’t miss the hint of royalty in the air. And if the day were not filled with enough symbolism, the groom entered the church after the bride’s grand entrance, presenting a living picture of Christ coming for his bride, the Church, in Jerusalem.

The short ceremony was spoken in Hebrew and English, and was attended by 120 people from the Holy Land and abroad—30 of which had just completed an eight-day pilgrimage in the Holy Land with the engaged couple.

The after-party was held in a traditional Bedouin tent and in the quarters of the 19th century church building.

The couple planned on honeymooning in Galilee and then visiting Ghana, Africa, to help in an orphanage and school, which their ministry supports. Once back in the States, they will travel from sea to shining sea, speaking the Bible dramatically from memory and teaching at Shasta Bible College until they return again to the land of milk and honey.

For more information on Tom and Sarah, visit www.thescripturecannotbebroken.com

The perfect choice

in Weddings by

After years of dating, you finally proposed to your girlfriend and she happily accepted. You are both excited and looking forward to the wedding planning in the months ahead. One of the first decisions you will make as the groom is who will serve as your best man. There are a number of people who could fulfill the role; you just have to decide who would make the best fit.

If you have several close family members and friends, you may find it difficult to select a best man. Make a list of candidates, keeping in mind that your best man does not have to be a man or a family member. Your sister Rita or best friend Katie might make a perfectly good best woman.

Before you begin narrowing your list, you must consider the duties your best man will have to perform. The responsibilities of the best man vary from wedding to wedding. Traditionally, they include:
• Hosting the bachelor party
• Picking up and returning all tuxedos
• Helping transport guests
• Getting the groom where he needs to go on the big day
• Assisting the groomsmen on the big day and keeping them on track
• Bringing the rings to the ceremony
• Witnessing the marriage license
• Paying and tipping service providers as needed
• Toasting the bride and groom at the reception
• Driving the newlyweds to the airport after the wedding if needed

Depending upon your schedule, you may have the best man do more or less for your wedding. If you have a long list of duties, you will want to select someone who is dependable and has the time to get everything done.

In order to narrow your list of potential candidates, consider their qualifications in relation to the duties you would like them to perform. Be realistic in your assessment. Your younger brother may be very dependable, but with school and work, he may be too busy to take on the role of best man, especially if it involves several duties. Your older, more-established brother might make a better choice. On the other hand, if all you are looking for is someone to host the bachelor party and stand up with you on your big day, then your younger brother might make a good choice.

Pay attention to the distance factor. If your brothers live in the Pacific Northwest and the wedding is in Miami, they might be too far away to be a good best man. Choosing a close friend who lives nearby and has easy access to everything might be better, especially if you want them to take an active role in the wedding planning.

Whoever tops your list, make sure they want to serve as your best man. For one reason or another, some people simply prefer being a wedding guest rather an attendant. Keep that in mind and make sure you find out what the frontrunners think before you make your final decision. Should you be unable to select just one person, don’t hesitate to divide the duties among two or three people. Rather than one best man and two groomsmen, you could have three best men.

Selecting a best man takes time and effort. Be prepared to do the work, or you could end up being disappointed, and always have a backup choice. You never know when illness or some other unforeseen event might come up and take precedence over your wedding.

by Tresa Erickson, MultiAd

Wedding Guide: Wee ones welcome

in Weddings by

While some couples opt not to have children at their wedding, others do. They take great delight in young children and can’t fathom having a celebration without them. If you share in this feeling and would like to have children at your wedding, make sure you plan for them accordingly.

If at all possible, hold your wedding in the morning or afternoon. The later your wedding is, the more likely your young guests will become tired and act out of sorts. Those accustomed to going to bed around 8 p.m. may even fall asleep during the celebration, forcing parents to leave early.

Look for a venue that is child friendly. Don’t select a hotel with a lot of fine antiques. Young guests will be too tempted to touch all of the wonderful things surrounding them. Select a hotel with modern decor and make sure there are rooms nearby where young guests can nap if needed. Ask your ushers to seat all parents with young kids near the back of the room during the ceremony so they can leave quickly if needed.

Provide ample entertainment. Even the best-behaved children act up when they get tired and bored. To prevent this at your reception, hand out crayons and coloring books to little ones at tables and set up an area where children can play after dinner. If most of your young guests can handle sitting by themselves, you could set up a separate table for them where they could sit, draw and color together. Just make sure you have an adult on hand to supervise the action.

If you have the budget, consider bringing in a clown, magician or some other form of entertainment for your young guests. If you are having your reception outdoors, rent a bouncy castle and find a volunteer to supervise the operation. You might even arrange for a group of volunteers to serve as babysitters and whisk the kids off to another room for hours of fun while their parents enjoy the reception.

Finally, make sure you have plenty of food and drink on hand. Provide snacks and beverages for young guests before dinner to alleviate any hunger pains they might be having. Then serve them a meal they will eat. Children do like to eat, but that doesn’t mean they will like what you are serving at your reception. For the best results, consult with your caterer and create a child-friendly menu for younger guests. Serve chicken nuggets and macaroni and cheese in lieu of lemon chicken and rice. Your younger guests will appreciate it, and so will their parents.

These are just some of the accommodations you can make for your young guests to ensure everyone has a good time. Keep in mind you may need to take fewer or additional measures depending upon the number of young guests at your wedding. If you are planning on five or six youngsters, then you may be able to have an evening wedding at an elite hotel. If you are planning on 10 to 20 youngsters, then you may need to set your wedding for an earlier time and bring in some entertainment. If your budget allows, you could always hire a professional on-site babysitting service and leave the supervising and entertaining to them!

by Tresa Erickson, MultiAd

Wedding Guide: The right person for the job

in Featured/Weddings by

You just got engaged, and already your mind is whirling with ideas for your wedding. Along with setting a date and choosing a venue, you will have to select wedding attendants. As the bride, you will probably want to start the process with your maid or matron of honor.

For some brides, selecting a maid of honor is a no-brainer. There is no one more suited for the job than their one and only sister or their best friend since kindergarten. For others, the decision is much more difficult. They have several sisters and close friends, plus a ton of cousins. In that case, the best course of action is to select a person who can fulfill all of the obligations of the job.

Depending upon your wishes, the maid of honor may have more or fewer duties to perform. Sit down and decide exactly what you would like your maid of honor to do. Make a list of their duties and a list of potential candidates for the job. Then start comparing the lists.

Be honest in your assessment of each candidate on your list. You need a person who not only will be willing to carry out the duties you assign but do them on time. You may love your little sister, but if she is a procrastinator, she may not be the best candidate for the job. Your older sister, on the other hand, might make a better choice because she is so timely.

Consider each candidate’s personal situation as well. What kind of commitments does she already have? If your older sister is a wife and mother, works full time and heads several committees, she may be too busy to serve as your matron of honor. If she is pregnant, she may be too tired and sick to perform the duties required. If she is going through a difficult divorce, she may not have the energy to devote to you and your wedding. Choose someone who doesn’t have as much on her plate to be your maid of honor.

If you plan to lean heavily on your maid of honor, make sure you choose someone who lives close enough to you to get the job done. If you live in the Midwest, don’t choose a cousin who lives on the coast to be your maid of honor. It will be hard for her to serve as the center of support from so far away. Choose that dependable friend who lives just down the street.

Choosing a maid of honor takes time. Don’t rush the process, and once you have found someone and she has agreed to serve as your maid of honor, make sure you communicate your wishes to her. If you want her to take an active role in the wedding planning, say so. If you would prefer she sit on the sidelines until the actual wedding day, let her know that. Give her a list of all of the tasks she will be responsible for and check in with her often to see how things are going.

Traditionally, maids of honor have a variety of responsibilities.

Some of these may include:

• Assisting the bride with much of
the wedding planning, including
choosing a reception venue,
decorations and flowers
• Helping the bride shop for a
wedding dress and bridesmaid
dresses
• Addressing the wedding
invitations
• Making or assembling the
wedding favors
• Hosting the bridal shower and
bachelorette party
• Attending the rehearsal
and helping out
at the rehearsal dinner
• Decorating and cleaning up
the reception site
• Receiving the flowers and
handing out all of the bouquets,
corsages and boutonnieres
• Helping the bride and bridesmaids
get dressed and making sure
they get where they need to be
at the appropriate time
• Holding the bride’s bouquet
during the ceremony
• Witnessing the marriage license
• Standing in the receiving line
• Taking part in the wedding
photos
• Toasting the couple
at the reception
• Dancing with the best man
and other guests

by Tresa Erickson, MultiAd

The second time around

in Weddings by

You’re getting married again, but this time, it is for keeps. You have found your soul mate, and the two of you want to express your love for each other and exchange vows in front of everyone you know. You’re definitely going to have a wedding, and as the bride, one of the first questions you have is what type of dress and accessories to wear. This is your second wedding, after all. You’re not supposed to wear white, right? Wrong!

The notion that women getting married again should not wear white is passe. A symbol of joy and commitment, white makes an excellent choice for a wedding dress color the second, third or subsequent time around. Off-white, ivory and pastels are also popular. Brides can even disband with light colors altogether and go for bolder, deeper colors, like burgundy, dark green or red.

The dress chosen should reflect the time, size and tone of the wedding, as well as the bride’s personality, lifestyle and fashion sense. It should also flatter her body type, playing up her strengths and downplaying her weaknesses.

As for accessories, brides getting married again may go with almost anything but a blusher. Experts advise against this and suggest brides that want to wear a veil let it trail down their back. For those who choose not to wear a veil, hats, hair ornaments and fresh flowers make excellent substitutes.

When it comes to the dress and accessories for your second wedding, you practically have free reign. You can go with the traditional or spread your wings and try something new. You may wear a gorgeous beaded white dress with a long train or a short red dress with spaghetti straps. It is entirely up to you. Just make sure you look stunning!
by Tresa Erickson, MultiAd

Must they eat cake?

in Featured/Weddings by

The engagement is announced, the date is set, attendants are selected and now the wedding plans begin. Dresses, tuxes, ceremony site, reception site, invitations, menu, guest list, flowers, cake …

Cake? Do you have to have cake? Does every wedding celebration have the ceremonial cutting of the tiered cake? Not anymore. Tradition has given way to personal preference and unique alternatives. Choices are as varied as the bride’s and groom’s personalities.

So what are your options? They run the gamut from elaborately decorated tiers to decorated sugar cookies.

Cutout cookies can be in the shape of a heart, mini wedding cake, boat or other related theme. Flavor options include Grandma’s favorite sugar cookie recipe, gingerbread, brownies, pumpkin, sour cream—any rollout recipe that lends itself to cookie cutters. The decorated cookies can then be personalized with the couple’s names, initials or wedding date. The unique confections can be displayed on a central table, serve as centerpieces on guests’ tables or placed at each place setting.

Rather than serving cake slices, some couples opt for a tiered display of doughnuts or cupcakes. In addition to the unique presentation, one advantage to serving cupcakes or doughnuts is the variety available for individual preferences. Serving dessert is also easier since guests can help themselves to their favorite treat.

A dessert table is another popular option for the wedding meal. The couple can offer their favorite selections of cheesecake, fluff, mousse, trifle, pudding and other sweets. Displayed on varied levels of pedestal plates, the desserts create an unexpected, attractive presentation. Covering the table with coordinating fabric and interspersing small bowls of mints, candies and nuts complete the festive look.

Having a small cake on each table allows guests to serve themselves. These cakes, which can double as centerpieces, can be simply decorated eight-inch layer cakes or they can be thematically decorated—purses, hearts, ships, dresses, baseballs, etc.—to reflect the couple’s unique interests. The originality of the creations will be a topic of conversation long after the wedding day.

Not to be tossed aside, however, is the traditional tiered cake. Flavors, fillings, textures, frosting and design all work together to present a culinary delight. No longer do guests anticipate a white cake with white butter cream frosting at a wedding. Bakeries offer such a wide range of options that no wedding cake should ever be predictable.

Brides and grooms have the opportunity to add a distinctive touch to their wedding day celebration. Not only will guests remember what the bride wore, but they will undoubtedly remember how personal and unique the reception was—especially the dessert.

by Tresa Erickson, MultiAd

Ward, Sullivan to wed

in Weddings by

Lawrence Ward of North Aurora and Darlene Ward of Somonauk announced the engagement of their daughter, Lara, to Bernard Anthony Sullivan, Jr., the son of Carol and Bernard Anthony Sullivan, Sr., of Bradenton, Fla.

The bride-to-be is a 1996 graduate of Kaneland High School, a 2000 graduate of Waubonsee and a 2003 graduate of Illinois State University. She is employed as a real estate agent.

The future groom attended DeVry University. He is employed by Hi-Tech Solutions, Inc.

The ceremony will be on Oct. 8, 2011, in St. Petersburg, Fla.

Continue the celebration

in Weddings by

After all of the showers, parties and wedding festivities, many couples have had enough and are ready to get on with the private celebration of their union at their honeymoon. You may feel like this is where you will be and scoff at your mother’s suggestion for a post-wedding brunch before you dash off on your honeymoon. Before you put the kibosh on the idea, consider the following.

A post-wedding brunch offers the bride and groom many opportunities. It gives them the chance to connect with guests they missed out on the day before and catch up on all of the details of the event, like little Jimmy breaking hearts on the dance floor. It also gives them the chance to personally thank all of those who assisted with the wedding preparations and those who took time off to travel to the wedding.

A post-wedding brunch also offers benefits for attendees. It gives someone like Aunt Gladys who may have wanted to be a part of the wedding festivities the opportunity to do so and provides out-of-town guests with a good breakfast before they set off for home. It also provides guests with another opportunity to connect and catch up with each other.

While some couples choose to end the public celebration of their union with their wedding reception, others choose to continue the celebration the next morning with a post-wedding brunch. Should you decide to go this route, keep it simple. The wedding is over. There is no need for you to get all gussied up and put on an elaborate affair. Most guests will be leaving for home right afterwards. Restrict invites to out-of-town guests and close family and friends and select a time for the brunch between 8 and 10 o’clock. This will give guests plenty of time to sleep in. Finally, serve a wide range of breakfast foods to suit all tastes.

A post-wedding brunch can be a fun way to unwind before you take off on your honeymoon. Give the idea some thought, and if time and budget permit, go for it!

by Tresa Erickson, MultiAd

Over the top

in Weddings by

Many a young girl dreams of marrying her prince one day in a lavish wedding. Planning such a wedding requires time and money, and lots of it. The more elaborate the wedding, the higher the price tag. Experts suggest that the average price for a wedding today runs anywhere from $20,000 to $30,000. For many folks, the figure is staggering. For others, it is a mere pittance.

There have been many weddings that cost millions of dollars throughout history, but the most expensive to date belongs to that of Vanish Mittal and Amit Bhatia. The six-day affair was held in France in 2004 and cost $55 to $60 million. Mittal’s father, the Indian Steel Maharajah, picked up the tab for the affair, which included performances by Sha Rukh Khan and Kylie Minogue.

Next to a multimillion-dollar wedding, a $12 million wedding dress might seem like nothing. The Diamond Wedding Gown from Renee Strausse and Martin Katz Jewellers featured 150 carats of diamonds and was the most expensive in the world. It was shown at the Luxury Brands Lifestyle Bridal Show in 2006, while the second-most expensive wedding dress was shown at Dubai’s Fashion & Diamonds Show. Designed by Yumi Katsura, the gown featured a thousand pearls and one of only two five-carat white gold diamonds in the world. It was valued at $8.5 million.

For wedding cakes, nothing can top the $20 million masterpiece of Nahid La Patisserie Artistique and Mimi So. The cake appeared in 2006 at the Luxury Bridal Show in Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills. Decked with jewels, it was not intended to be eaten.

The tab for flowers for the average wedding can run in the hundreds of dollars, but the most expensive wedding bouquet cost way more, about $125,000. The red and white bouquet features 90 gemstones, nine diamonds and a star-shaped ruby and is on display on the sixth floor of the Ruby Plaza in Hano, Vietnam.

Money is not always an object in wedding planning. It is hard to imagine someone spending millions of dollars on a once-in-a-lifetime event, but it does happen, often with celebrities and the well-to-do. Sometimes the marriage works, and sometimes it doesn’t, begging the question if over-the-top weddings are worth it.

by Tresa Erickson, MultiAd

Must they eat cake?

in Featured/Weddings by

The engagement is announced, the date is set, attendants are selected and now the wedding plans begin. Dresses, tuxes, ceremony site, reception site, invitations, menu, guest list, flowers, cake…

Cake? Do you have to have cake? Does every wedding celebration have the ceremonial cutting of the tiered cake? Not anymore. Tradition has given way to personal preference and unique alternatives. Choices are as varied as the bride’s and groom’s personalities.

So what are your options? They run the gamut from elaborately decorated tiers to decorated sugar cookies.

Cutout cookies can be in the shape of a heart, mini wedding cake, boat or other related theme. Flavor options include Grandma’s favorite sugar cookie recipe, gingerbread, brownies, pumpkin, sour cream—any rollout recipe that lends itself to cookie cutters. The decorated cookies can then be personalized with the couple’s names, initials or wedding date. The unique confections can be displayed on a central table, serve as centerpieces on guests’ tables or placed at each place setting.

Rather than serving cake slices, some couples opt for a tiered display of doughnuts or cupcakes. In addition to the unique presentation, one advantage to serving cupcakes or doughnuts is the variety available for individual preferences. Serving dessert is also easier since guests can help themselves to their favorite treat.

A dessert table is another popular option for the wedding meal. The couple can offer their favorite selections of cheesecake, fluff, mousse, trifle, pudding and other sweets. Displayed on varied levels of pedestal plates, the desserts create an unexpected, attractive presentation. Covering the table with coordinating fabric and interspersing small bowls of mints, candies and nuts complete the festive look.

Having a small cake on each table allows guests to serve themselves. These cakes, which can double as centerpieces, can be simply decorated eight-inch layer cakes or they can be thematically decorated—purses, hearts, ships, dresses, baseballs, etc.—to reflect the couple’s unique interests. The originality of the creations will be a topic of conversation long after the wedding day.

Not to be tossed aside, however, is the traditional tiered cake. Flavors, fillings, textures, frosting and design all work together to present a culinary delight. No longer do guests anticipate a white cake with white butter cream frosting at a wedding. Bakeries offer such a wide range of options that no wedding cake should ever be predictable.

Brides and grooms have the opportunity to add a distinctive touch to their wedding day celebration. Not only will guests remember what the bride wore, but they will undoubtedly remember how personal and unique the reception was-especially the dessert.

by Tresa Erickson, MultiAd

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