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Editorial/Opinion - page 13

Letter: A thank you to Kaneville Fire Department

in Letters to the Editor by

I wanted to take a moment and thank the Kaneville Fire Department for the wonderful Easter egg hunt they held for the community on Saturday, April 12.

Our family moved here not too long ago from a large city, and we have never seen anything like what the kind folks at the Kaneville Fire Department did for us all last weekend. We were amazed at how they moved all the trucks out of the fire station, set up tables and provided a wonderful free lunch. They had the trucks on display for the kids to see, and an Easter bunny there to visit with the kids. The folks at the Fire Department were so warm and welcoming. And then the best part was the walk down the street behind a fire truck leading the way to the egg hunt. Normally my children are lucky if they ever get five to 10 eggs in a hunt. At this egg hunt they each ended up with 50 eggs! I was shocked at the amount and how generous the good folks were with this egg hunt.

We have decided small towns are awesome, especially Kaneville, when it comes to giving to the community. We want to thank all who helped with and provided this wonderful egg hunt for our family. Everything was wonderful and we are so thankful to you for your great kindness and generosity.

Robin Hansen
Kaneville

Letter: Visit the Sugar Grove Farmers Market

in Letters to the Editor by

Veggies, fruits and eggs harvested within a day or two of a farmers market are fresh, crisp, loaded with flavor and packed with nutrients. Today, more than ever, it is so important to understand where and how your produce, eggs and meat have been grown.

Fruits and vegetables shipped to us from other states, and today mostly from other countries, must have tough skins that survive packing and shipping, and also require the ability to have a reasonable shelf life. Only a handful of hybrid varieties have these characteristic, so there is little genetic diversity in commercially grown plants compared to the large number of varieties our local farms still grow so as to provide us all with an array of great-tasting crops all season long.

Heirloom plants used by our farmers may even someday provide the genes needed to create crops, which will thrive in changing climates. Locally grown food preserves genetic diversity, and if you are opposed to eating genetically modified fruits and veggies, you can rest assured that our farm produce was bred the old fashioned way, as nature intended—GMO free.

Buying from our local farmers preserves our open space and keeps our taxes in check, and the farms support a clean environment, which benefits not only us but all area wildlife. As you build a relationship with the farmer you deal with at the market, you establish a relationship based on understanding and trust.

Farmers are a vanishing breed. When you make a conscious decision to support your local farmers market or local farm stand, you help insure that future generations will have access to the nourishing and abundant crops that our Illinois farmers work so hard to bring to our communities.

Join us at the opening of the 11th Sugar Grove Farmers Market on Saturday, June 7, from 8 a.m. to noon at the Sugar Grove Village Hall, Route 30 and Municipal Drive in Sugar Grove. “Like” us on Facebook or request more information at patdangraceffa@gmail.com.

Pat Graceffa, Danyell D’Agostino
Sugar Grove Farmers Market co-managers

Letter: Thank you to those who donated blood

in Letters to the Editor by

The Elburn American Legion Auxiliary Post 630 would like to thank everyone who made the April 8 Elburn community blood drive a success. We had 28 volunteers and were able to collect 25 pints of blood.

A grateful thanks goes out to Greg Algrim, Ronald Alms, John Anderson, Arthur Anderson, Karen Baston, Sandra Berringer, Rebecca Hale, Steven Hall, Donna Baughman, Peter Baughman, Deborah Hannemann, Roxane Hartman, Steven Hauser, Connie Hodson, Allan Jackan, Cheryl Krauspe, Karl Kruthoff, Pete Kuefler, Mark Lund, Larry Schramm, James Staley, Rebecca Staley, Marilyn Swift, Robert Weihofen and Alvah Withey. Also, a big thanks goes to the Auxiliary ladies who coordinated the project: Kay Swift, Helen Johnson and Lois Mack.

The next blood drive will take place on Thursday, June 26, from 2 to 6:30 p.m. at the American Legion Hall in Elburn. Please save the date.

Kay Swift
American Legion Auxiliary Post 630

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Editorial: Help support Kaneland’s upcoming service trip

in From the Editor's Desk by

A screening of the film “Murph the Protector” will take place in the Kaneland High School auditorium on Friday, April 25, at 7 p.m. to help raise funds for a June service trip to famous World War I and II sites.

Students and adult chaperones who participate in the service trip will work with the American Battlefield Monuments Commission to preserve and maintain American military cemeteries in France.

Admission to the April 25 event is free. Monetary donations to help defray the cost of the trip will be accepted.

The film “Murph the Protector” tells the story of U.S. Navy Lieutenant Michael Murphy, the leader of the four-man SEAL team depicted in the recent film “Lone Survivor.” Murphy in 2005 was exposed to enemy fire on a mountain top in Afghanistan while attempting to call in a rescue of his team. Murphy was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor by then-president George W. Bush in October 2007.

We’ve covered Kaneland service trips in previous years, including the school’s 2011 trip to Northern Virginia and its 2012 trip to Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C. This time around, the travel is intercontinental, and will take a number of Kaneland students to places that served as stages for conflicts during the first two world wars.

The trips are far from sightseeing ventures, however. Kaneland students in 2011 worked with the National Park Service (NPS) and did some restoration at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania national battlefields. The group stayed in 1930s-era Civilian Conservation Corps cabins in Prince William National Forest during the trip and cooked for themselves to keep costs down.

In 2012, the service group worked with NPS rangers at Antietam Civil War Battlefield in Maryland. That September marked the 150th anniversary of the battle, so students helped prepare the park for commemoration ceremonies.

In order to minimize costs on the 2012 trip, the group stayed at a youth hostel where sleeping accommodations were “bunk house” style. Students made their own meals in the kitchen.

The service trips are coordinated by Kaneland Social Studies teacher Javier Martinez. For further information regarding the June 2014 service trip, you can reach Martinez at Javier.Martinez@kaneland.org.

Letter: A thank you and message from Valerie Burd

in Letters to the Editor by

Thank you to all of you who voted for me on March 18 to be a candidate for State Representative in the 50th District. Even though I was running unopposed, you still took the time to vote for me. Your encouragement is greatly appreciated.
To those of you who have not yet met me, I would very much like to talk with you. Please contact me and let’s discuss the issues that are important to you. You can email me at Val.Burd1@gmail.com or reach me via my website at www.valerieburd.com. I have a survey on my website that you can fill out to send me your opinions. In the next seven months, I will be out knocking on doors and meeting with as many residents of Kendall and Kane counties as I can.
If you or your neighbors would like to get together with me, let me know. What you think and have to say are important to me, no matter if you are Republican, Democrat or Independent. We all need to work together if we are going to solve the very serious problems that are facing our state.
My opponent and I have very different viewpoints on all the issues. That’s why it is important for you to take the time to get to know us. Ask us questions. Don’t rely on hearsay about either of us. Get the facts. Next November you will have a real choice. It’s an important choice for our district. I hope you will consider voting for me.
Valerie Burd
Candidate, Illinois State Representative,
50th District

Letter: School Board unconcerned with taxpayers’ financial interests?

in Letters to the Editor by

The Kaneland School Board recently authorized spending $225,000 on 91 iPad Minis and 588 Chromebooks for the district’s students without informing themselves or the District tax payers of an implementation plan for the devices. Yet at the same meeting, the board tabled the vote to raise the hot lunch cost by $.50 in order to obtain more information.
Taxpayers—does it seem like the board members, whom we have elected, are not diligently watching out for our financial interests? The board will spend close to a quarter of a million dollars on electronics without a plan and question a $.50 increase for hot lunches that is required to be compliant with the state Board of Education.
Or do you, the taxpayers of District 302, even care how our tax monies are handled by the Kaneland School Board?
Jeff Armesy
Sugar Grove

Letter: A thank you to blood drive participants

in Letters to the Editor by

This has been a long and difficult winter, but you helped us fill the shortages of every blood type. We thank the Sugar Grove Firefighters Auxiliary, the Sugar Grove Fire Department, the Heartland Blood Center staff and all our other volunteers for their hard work on a successful blood drive.
A heartfelt thank you to our awesome donors: Suzanne Barnhart, Judy Burscheid, Erika Carlson, Brian Carpenter, Paul Carter, Amy Curtin, Matt Curtin, Jon Diaz, Sue Diaz, Michelle Ehlers, Scott Fagust, Amanda Felella, Elise Fichtel, Ann Guernon, Brandon Hamblen, Lori Hamilton Coffey, George Hannemann, Dustin Hawkins, Pam Hughes, Colleen Ickes, John Jandovitz, Kristen Johns, Doug Jorgensen, Laura Keske, Steve Kowalczyk, Nicole Lamela, Ed Malert, Bonnie Mateas, Sally McClellan, Suzanne McCracken, Sean Michels, Pat Morey, Bryan Needham, Clarence Nolan, Kirsten Pehl, Bill Perkins, Jenny Perkins, Nika Plattos, Rachel Roop, Jodie Rubo, Brian Schiber, Jennifer Schmidt, Edward Schuster, Christy Seawall, Gregory W. Smith, Chris Steenwyk, Jeff Steenwyk, Jeni Suehs, Colby Suits, Patricia Torza, Kyle Wease, Alicia Weiss, Emily West, Michael Wilger, Annette Wood and Ally Woody.
We deeply appreciate those who attempted but were unable to donate blood.
Joy Rubo
Blood drive coordinator, Sugar Grove

Community Corner: Fine Arts Festival will delight all ages

in Community Corner by

by Maria Dripps-Paulson,
KAI executive director

Sunday, April 13, will mark the 15-year anniversary of the Kaneland Arts Initiative’s signature event, the Kaneland Community Fine Arts Festival.

The festival was born out of a need to offer an event to showcase the arts at a professional level to Kaneland families and community members. Attended by over 3,000 patrons, the festival has always been free to attend and is a wonderful tradition for all ages.

This year’s festival is no exception, promising to delight all ages. Besides the hands-on art and storytime provided by Kaneland public libraries, preschool-aged students will be treated to the interactive African folktale “Handa’s Surprise,” where they will be able to make masks and take part in the tale told by Lande Sanusi from The CAKE Village (www.thecakevillage.com).

The Kaneland High School art club will provide temporary tattoos, face-painting and balloon art. Workshops will include origami, glass fusing, Korean calligraphy, and the ever-popular caricature drawings of Michael Shiroda.

Professional visual artists will create art in traditional art forms such as oil, acrylic, watercolor and pottery. Several artists will be creating art in mixed media, combining multiple materials and mediums. Kaneland student artwork will be available for auction next to professional artwork donated by this year’s artists. Over 500 students’ art pieces will be displayed from all of the schools within the Kaneland School District.

This year’s Kaneland Alumni Spotlight will be the Dylan Good Trio at 11 a.m. in the Kaneland auditorium. Dylan is a graduate of Kaneland High School and will bring his jazz trio to the Festival.

Also on the Kaneland Auditorium stage will be the Fox Valley Children’s Chorus, American Eagle Shows’ production of “James and the Giant Peach,” and the “Barefoot Hawaiian.” In the Arts pavilion, the Kaneland Youth Orchestra will return to play, as well as the Hix Bros. Ukulele Ensemble.

For 15 years, the award-winning Kaneland Community Fine Arts Festival has been supported by the Kaneland School District, as well as many other financial sponsors. The Kaneland Arts Initiative would like to thank its sponsors: Elburn Herald, Midwest Window and Supply, Open Range Southwest Grill restaurant, Elburn Chiropractic & Acupuncture, Ross Electric, Inc., Vons Electric, Inc., and Waubonsee Community College.

More information can be found on the KAI website, www.kanelandartsinitiative.org, or the KAI Facebook page, www.facebook.com/KanelandArtsInitiative.

Editor’s note
The above community-submitted column is one part of our broader mission to help our readers connect with their communities. If you or your organization would like to be part of our Community Corner initiative, please contact Editor Keith Beebe at kbeebe@elburnherald.com. Please note that no for-profit or elected officials are eligible to be part of the Community Corner.

Editorial: A thank you to local candidates

in From the Editor's Desk by

It was three weeks ago when we concluded our coverage of the 2014 General Election Primary, and we’d like to use this space to thank all of the local candidates who took time out to complete an Elburn Herald questionnaire.

It was a privilege to interact with candidates in the races for U.S. Senate, Kane County Clerk, Kane County Sheriff, Kane County Board District 5 and 50th District Representative, and we look forward to furthering communication with the nominated representatives in the weeks leading up to this fall’s election. It’s sure to be an exciting time for Kane County and nearby districts.

We’d also like to extend a thanks to the candidates for 16th Judicial Circuit 3rd Subcircuit, as they also took time out of their schedule to complete our questionnaire. Unfortunately, we were unable to feature their entries in the paper due to space constraints. Still, it was a pleasure to get to know the four candidates who ran for their respective Republican nomination earlier this month, and we look forward to seeing them in action in November.

Lastly, we want to thank you, the reader, for allowing the Elburn Herald to bring you comprehensive coverage of this spring’s election. Our goal was to leave no stone unturned while researching the field and gathering information from each featured candidate, and we’d like to think we succeeded in that regard. And if not, we hope to do better next time around.

After all, you deserve the best election content available. And the Elburn Herald feels honored to have an opportunity to further introduce local candidates to the Kaneland community and additional portions of Kane County.

So thank you to this March’s election candidates, and thank you to those who took time out to visit the polls and vote on March 18.

Community corner: Fine Arts Festival will delight all ages

in Community Corner by

by Maria Dripps-Paulson,
KAI executive director
Sunday, April 13, will mark the 15-year anniversary of the Kaneland Arts Initiative’s signature event, the Kaneland Community Fine Arts Festival.
The festival was born out of a need to offer an event to showcase the arts at a professional level to Kaneland families and community members. Attended by over 3,000 patrons, the festival has always been free to attend and is a wonderful tradition for all ages.
This year’s festival is no exception, promising to delight all ages. Besides the hands-on art and storytime provided by Kaneland public libraries, preschool-aged students will be treated to the interactive African folktale “Handa’s Surprise,” where they will be able to make masks and take part in the tale told by Lande Sanusi from The CAKE Village (www.thecakevillage.com).
The Kaneland High School art club will provide temporary tattoos, face-painting and balloon art. Workshops will include origami, glass fusing, Korean calligraphy, and the ever-popular caricature drawings of Michael Shiroda.
Professional visual artists will create art in traditional art forms such as oil, acrylic, watercolor and pottery. Several artists will be creating art in mixed media, combining multiple materials and mediums. Kaneland student artwork will be available for auction next to professional artwork donated by this year’s artists. Over 500 students’ art pieces will be displayed from all of the schools within the Kaneland School District.
This year’s Kaneland Alumni Spotlight will be the Dylan Good Trio at 11 a.m. in the Kaneland auditorium. Dylan is a graduate of Kaneland High School and will bring his jazz trio to the Festival.
Also on the Kaneland Auditorium stage will be the Fox Valley Children’s Chorus, American Eagle Shows’ production of “James and the Giant Peach,” and the “Barefoot Hawaiian.” In the Arts pavilion, the Kaneland Youth Orchestra will return to play, as well as the Hix Bros. Ukulele Ensemble.
For 15 years, the award-winning Kaneland Community Fine Arts Festival has been supported by the Kaneland School District, as well as many other financial sponsors. The Kaneland Arts Initiative would like to thank its sponsors: Elburn Herald, Midwest Window and Supply, Open Range Southwest Grill restaurant, Elburn Chiropractic & Acupuncture, Ross Electric, Inc., Vons Electric, Inc., and Waubonsee Community College.
More information can be found on the KAI website, www.kanelandartsinitiative.org, or the KAI Facebook page, www.facebook.com/ KanelandArtsInitiative.

Editor’s note
The above community-submitted column is one part of our broader mission to help our readers connect with their communities. If you or your organization would like to be part of our Community Corner initiative, please contact Editor Keith Beebe at kbeebe@elburnherald.com. Please note that no for-profit or elected officials are eligible to be part of the Community Corner.

Webpoll: Have you kept up with your New Year’s resolution?

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Letter: Thank you from Kaneland Sports Boosters

in Letters to the Editor by

On Saturday, March 15, Kaneland Sports Boosters hosted its “Knight to Remember” spring fundraiser. The night included a Red Woody concert, silent auction and a number of raffles, highlighted by our grand prize raffle. I am extremely humbled to write that over 70 companies, businesses, teams and individuals contributed to the fundraiser, and over 250 supporters attended to help raise thousands to help support the Kaneland sports programs.

The purpose of the Kaneland Sports Boosters is to provide our athletes and coaches with the “extras” that the school budget cannot fund. Each year, the boosters provide tens of thousands of dollars of raised funds to enhance our sports programs at Kaneland High School and Harter Middle School. Over the past year, we have purchased shooting machines for basketball, spiking machines for volleyball, elliptical training equipment for wrestling, a new electronic timing and video system for track, outdoor tents for cross country and track, every game ball used by our fall, winter and spring sports teams, lodging and transportation for our State-qualifying athletes and teams, and many other important equipment needs. Additionally, we made our annual $1,000 donation to Special Olympics, a $1,000 donation the Washington High School Athletic Department Tornado Relief Fund, and will award four $1,000 scholarships to graduating Kaneland seniors.

None of these funding needs would be met without the generous support of our “Knight to Remember” supporters. We would like to thank the following supporters for their contributions and help at the “Knight to Remember” spring fundraiser: Ace Hardware of Aurora, Alice’s Ice Cream, Anderson Fitness Studio, Anne Shaw, Annette and Dick Theobald, Audrey Ritchey, Bob McCaffrey, Bob Septic, Bob Davidson of HD Backhoe, Boombah of Batavia, Bryan Zwemke, Cadence Fitness and Health, Cadence Health Center, Catering Gourmet, Castle Bank, Cindy Babich, Couture Tan, Dawn Wilkinson, Eddie Gaedel’s, Elburn Car Wash, Emily Kay Salon, Ernie Colombe, Fairview Dental, Fireside Restaurant, Genoa Pizza of Sugar Grove, Great Clips of Sugar Grove, the Guerra Family, Harner’s Bakery, Hair Cuttery, Hair Directors, Heather Espe, It’s Raining Cats & Dogs, Julie Jones, Joann Sleezer, Kelly Woods, Kirhoffers Sporting Goods, Kaneland High School sports teams and coaches, Kaneland Harter Middle School sports teams and coaches, Kim Stanley, KingWok 47, Kristi Parrott, Laurie Hannula Photography, Linda Ross, Lindstrom Chiropractic, Lois Kral, Matt Suhey, Mindy Maloney, Mychelle Prichard, Nanette’s Giving Boutique, Norma and Jay Strang, Open Range Southwest Grill, Paisano’s Pizza, Rachel Muckerheide, Ream’s Elburn Market, the Redman Family, Renew Salon, Roxanne Sowell, Salon Derganto, Schmidt’s Towne Tap, Scott and Melanie Kuhar, Shanne Kuipers, Sign FX, Snap Fitness, Tracy Healy, the Thielk Family, Vaughn Athletic Center, Vera Bradley Corporation, Walter Payton Foundation, West Physical Therapy, Zizi Nail Salon, and the many Sports Booster members who committed long hours to making this event a success.

On behalf of the Kaneland Sports Boosters and the Kaneland High School and Harter Middle School athletes and coaches, we say thank you. We could not have done this without your generous support.

Ryan Delahanty
President, Kaneland Sports Boosters

Editorial: Don’t ask us about our bracket

in From the Editor's Desk by

“How’s your bracket?”

It’s a question that serves as a popular conversation starter this time of year, for both sports nuts and the casual observer. And it’s something very few of us want to hear or discuss.

The “bracket” in question refers to the NCAA men’s basketball tournament (aka March Madness), cultivating in April’s Final Four weekend. And every spring, our friends, relatives and co-workers put forth countless tournament pools for us to join. It takes no more than 10-15 minutes to complete a standard NCAA tournament bracket, and it takes even less time for it to be demolished by upsets, buzzer beaters, bizarre gaffes and just about anything else that can possibly affect a college basketball game.

And so questions about one’s bracket typically are answered with something along the lines of “don’t ask” or “I hate (insert name of eliminated national powerhouse).” Seriously. You could venture out to a Buffalo Wild Wings or any sports bar right now and actually hear those exact responses. Rarely will you meet someone who can brag about their bracket once the tournament’s opening weekend has concluded. And if you do find that person, give it a week. Chances are they’ll be singing a much sadder tune. Misery indeed loves company.

That’s why billionaire Warren Buffett recently offered a $1 billion reward to the person who could predict every game within the tournament. That’s right—$1 billion dollars to the bracket correctly calling all 63 games. Seems a little lopsided until, of course, you factor in the odds of authoring a perfect bracket: 1:9,223,372,036,854,775,808. That’s a lot of commas. And now Buffett’s offer seems plenty lopsided, just in the other direction.

Fortunately, it only takes a halfway decent bracket to win a pool. If you can pick a few early upsets and correctly call at least three of the teams that will land in the Final Four come April, you’re in business. And if you can prognosticate just how those final three games turnout, you might be in the driver’s seat, depending on how many people are in said pool—if it’s over 50 people, you’ll need to be much more accurate with your picks; that means you’ll have to embrace both logic and risk while filling out your bracket.

Oddly, the emotion teams exhibit on the court during March Madness (players screaming their heads off after draining a game-winning shot; players crying inconsolably while curled into the fetal position on the hardwood) is often matched by those who’ve placed the fate of their bracket on those teams. It’s kind of sad to watch someone’s bracket go down in flames, but it’s kind of comforting, as well, especially if our bracket has long since bitten the dust. Again, misery loves company.

Here’s a deal: don’t ask us about our bracket and we won’t ask about yours. And when Florida, Michigan State, Arizona and Louisville (the popular Final Four picks this year) eventually lose to schools with vastly inferior rosters, we can share a glance that means only one thing.

“Bracket? What bracket?”

Letter: Thank you to Kane County voters

in Letters to the Editor by

On behalf of the Don Kramer for Kane County Sheriff campaign team, I would like to thank all the residents who answered their doors and were so friendly to me and my volunteers. I realize having a stranger coming to your door and asking for your time can be an inconvenience, but this is the best way to meet you candidatesr. I also thank you for asking complex questions and giving me your advice on matters that concern our community.

As the November General Election approaches, I plan to go door-to-door and meet with more voters. Please don’t be afraid to ask questions and give your opinions. I hope you will not mind if our volunteers leave behind campaign literature if no one is home. You can also find out more about your sheriff candidates on the Internet at their websites. I ask that you take some time to look at the qualifications for each candidate before the next election.

I would also like to thank my opponent, Kevin Williams, for running an issue-based campaign that focused on the problems that face our community. Lieutenant Williams will help make a strong leadership team at the Sheriff’s Office.

Lastly, I ask for your help in taking down any remaining campaign yard signs for me and other candidates. If you supported a candidate that won the General Primary Election, please hold on to that sign and put it back up after Oct. 1. Other signs can be returned to the candidates, or you can contact the Central Committee for the Republican or Democratic parties.

Don Kramer
Republican Candidate for Kane County Sheriff

Letter: A thank you from Chris Halsey

in Letters to the Editor by

I would like to thank Dan Hanneman, Keith Hougas and all of the members of the Elburn Lions Club—the greatest Lions Club in the state of Illinois—for hosting my “Roar,” and the businesses, residents and friends that contributed and attended. I would never have imagined that 200 would be in attendance. I promise to represent you (and brag about you) in the best way possible.

Chris Halsey
Elburn Lions Club

Webpoll: Did you fill out an NCAA Bracket?

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Editorial: Clarifying the Sugar Grove Public Library limited rate increase referendum

in From the Editor's Desk by

It came to our attention recently that there was a bit of confusion regarding our recent coverage of the Sugar Grove Public Library limited rate increase referendum. Because it’s our mission to bring you the clearest and most accurate information possible—especially the information you use in the voting booth on Election Day—we’d like to take an opportunity here to revisit and clearly define the limited rate increase item.

The Sugar Grove Public Library hopes to increase its limiting rate an additional $2.14 per month, or $25 more per year (for a home valued at $100,000), through a referendum on the March 18 ballot. The library needs additional funds to maintain the facility and grounds, support a number of current programs, departments and new programs it would like to add. The additional money would help the library afford the purchase of more materials in physical and downloadable formats, as well as the purchase of new computers to replace aging ones.

The library has attempted to raise the limiting rate in the past to no avail. The one-time increase would provide adequate funding to operate and maintain the library in its larger facility now and into the future.

“If the limiting rate passed during the referendum, we could have the library open every day with consistent hours,” said Library Director Carol Dolin. “We want to avoid being open some mornings and some evenings so people can remember when we are open more easily.”

The library staff is concerned with the library’s current budget.

“We need more funding to be open more hours, to provide more physical and downloadable materials, and to care for the building,” Dolin said. “We will survey the public to get input on how to prioritize those areas of the budget. Finally, with adequate funding, we may be able to refinance the building bonds to save tax payers money as we pay off the debt.”

The Sugar Grove library currently has the lowest limiting rate in the area, with Kaneville, Oswego, Elburn, Aurora and Batavia all possessing higher rates. With a vast amount of services offered, the library staff hopes that the public will vote to pass the referendum to ensure that the library can continue to offer a large variety of programs and materials.

Should the referendum pass, the library staff will survey the public to understand their needs and expectations for library hours, programs and materials.

Letter: An explanation of Electric Aggregation Referendum

in Letters to the Editor by

On March 18, the residents of unincorporated Kane County will have an opportunity to vote on the Kane County Electric Aggregation Referendum. This referendum, if passed, will allow the Kane County Board to potentially secure cheaper electricity for residential and small commercial users within unincorporated Kane County.

As a member of the Kane County Board, I appreciate the opportunity to serve you and look for ways to save you money. The referendum simply gives the county the right to solicit competitive bids. Once the bids are received, then the County Board will decide if it is in the best interest of the residents in unincorporated Kane County to move to the lower supplier. If not, all county unincorporated residents will remain with ComEd for the following 12 months.

Also, there will be no change to your billing. ComEd will continue to send your monthly bill. They will still deliver the electricity and you will still call ComEd for service and outages. You will not be required to participate in the new program. Every unincorporated resident who does not already have an alternate supplier will receive a letter with the opportunity to “opt out” of the new program at no cost to them. If ComEd’s rate is less expensive than the lowest-quoted electric supplier, ComEd will remain the electric supplier.

I believe this electric aggregation program will save you money. I hope you will get out and vote on March 18.

Christopher J. Lauzen
Kane County Board Chairman
Drew Frasz
Kane County Board Representative, District 18
Barb Wojnicki
Kane County Board Representative, District 15

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