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Hultgren accepting intern applications for spring 2014

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GENEVA—U.S. Representative Randy Hultgren (IL-14) recently announced that he is now accepting applications for spring 2014 semester internships in both his Washington, D.C. and Geneva offices. The position is unpaid and will run approximately from January to May. Academic credit may be available, and schedules can be flexible for those with classes or other obligations. Applicants from the 14th Congressional District are preferred.

“I have spent the last few months gaining valuable Capitol Hill experience while learning vital administrative skills,” said Alex, a current intern. “From learning office procedures and constituent services, to giving tours, to writing constituent response letters and answering their concerns promptly, I’ve honed my understanding of what it takes to run a congressional office effectively while gaining valuable insight into policy and the political process.”

Applicants should be college students or recent graduates, and will assist staff with constituent relations, policy and outreach efforts. Many duties will be administrative in nature, but interns may also be asked to staff Congressman Hultgren at meetings in the district or assist legislative staff in Washington.

Applicants should email a resume, cover letter and writing sample to email.randy@mail.house.gov and specify whether they seek a position for the Geneva or Washington, D.C. office.

Waubonsee instructor John Reese appointed to INC 708 Board

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AURORA—A professor at Waubonsee Community College, with decades of experience as a mental health and addiction counselor, has been appointed to the board overseeing the distribution of public money to social service organizations in southern Kane County, dedicated to helping those with various mental health, disability or substance abuse needs.

John Reese, of Aurora, Associate Professor of Human Services at Waubonsee, was appointed in October to a three-year term on the Board of Directors for INC 708 Board – Mental Health and Mental Retardation Services Inc.

The Aurora-based INC 708 Board is a partnership of seven township community mental health boards, which were established under local referendums in previous years to provide funding to support programs for those requiring services related to mental health, developmental disability or substance abuse.

INC 708 Board distributes money raised through property taxes levied in those seven townships to 22 agencies, which serve about 17,000 southern Kane County residents each year.

Reese said providing assistance to those with mental health and substance abuse issues remains “my passion.”

“This is just part of my commitment to giving back to the community,” Reese said.

The appointment marks Reese’s first formal involvement with the INC 708 Board.

However, Reese said he had remained very familiar with the INC 708 Board’s work during his years of work since 1969 as a mental health and substance abuse professional in the Aurora area.

Reese has served in various roles within the mental health and counseling field, including as a counselor, clinical supervisor, and executive director of both inpatient and outpatient programs.

Reese serves on the board of directors for the Illinois Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Professional Certification Association (IAODAPCA), where he serves as chairperson of the Accredited Counselor Training Programs Committee.

In 2007, he was named the IAODAPCA’s Counselor of the Year.

At Waubonsee, Reese helped to develop the college’s human services department, and served as an adjunct instructor for a decade, until he was appointed a full-time instructor in 1999.

Within the community, Reese also serves as chairperson for the advisory board for Gateway Aurora, as president of Citizens Organized for Recovery and Education of Illinois, and as a member of both the West Towns and Aurora community resource team.

Bright lights in the village

in Elburn/Regional by
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Local resident wins national recognition for Christmas lights
CAMPTON HILLS—Brian Larsen recently received national acclaim for a Christmas display he calls a “labor of love.”

“Some guys collect Corvettes and Porsches,” Larsen said. “I do Christmas lights.”

The 37-year-old father of three on Monday won a nation-wide contest for the Christmas light display on his home in Campton Hills. Larsen, who owns Countywide Landscaping, began decorating his house when he bought it in 1996. Back then, the display was just “regular static lights,” he said.

When Larsen was a boy in nearby Batavia, he and his family used to go on tours of other people’s Christmas lights. “Heavy into Christmas,” he and his family would also go Christmas caroling and enjoy other holiday activities.

“Christmas is a big part of my life,” he said. “And when I got my own house, I had the freedom to do what I wanted.”

A few years ago, he began to get ambitious and competitive with his displays.

People began showing up in their cars to get a look—and a listen—to the light display he had synchronized with bombastic Christmas music. Each year, he would add more lights and different kinds of decorations. He said he stopped counting lights three years ago at 778,000.

His Beith Road home became a destination for people in the area, as they would arrive as it got dark and park along the road near his house, at times becoming quite a crowd. He said just knowing that people are out there enjoying it puts a smile on his face.

Self-taught in the science of synchronizing music to the lights, Larsen said he’s “one of those geeks who sits up at night watching YouTube,” which is how he picked up the skills.

“It’s a big community,” he said. “Putting lights to music has really taken off. Everybody’s doing it.”

He has 30 programmed songs, 20 of which he’s using this year. He said it takes him about 80 hours to program a song.

This year, he was approached by the creators of the TV show, “The Great Christmas Light Fight,” to take part in the nationwide contest.

Michael Maloney and Sabrina Soto, hosts of ABC’s “Extreme Makeover,” were the judges for “The Great Christmas Light Fight,” and the object of the program was to create the most spectacular outdoor display in just three weeks.

Putting in 15-16-hour days with the help of his friends, he accomplished in 21 days what typically takes him three months. The camera crew was there for about eight days, and after that, they used time-lapsed photography to capture the work-in-progress.

Larsen said that this year’s display is by far his favorite. He added 1,200 strobe lights and estimates that by now, there are about 1 million lights in all. There are 37 lighted trees and 24 programmable panels of lights of text and graphics featured on the sides of the house.

The lights are all energy-efficient LEDs, so his electric bill is only about an extra $200 a month while the display is active.

This year, Larsen also paved a parking lot for viewers to get in off of the street, and his father set up a concession where he can sell pulled pork and beef sandwiches, hot dogs and hot chocolate. The lot can fit 50 cars.

Larsen said he plans to continue doing the displays as long as he is physically able. He loves people’s reactions to the light show. He said that a man proposed marriage to his girlfriend out in front of the lights a few nights ago. And elderly people show up in buses on a regular basis to view the light show.

A few years ago, a man who had recently lost his job told Larsen that the lights made him feel better.

Winning the contest will gain him $50,000. When asked what he’s going to do with the money, he said he was going to hire someone to take down the lights.

“There’s no glory in taking them down,” he said with a laugh.

Photos by Lynn Logan

Elburn Food Pantry benefits from Kane County Farm Bureau

in Elburn/Regional by

ELBURN—The Elburn Food Pantry is just one of the 20 food pantry recipients of donations from Kane County Farm Bureau members.

The Farm Bureau, through its Harvest for All and other hunger relief programs, has recently surpassed its goal of providing the equivalent of 1 million meals to local food pantries and the Northern Illinois Food Bank. As of Dec. 10, the number reached 1,092,781 meals, according to Farm Bureau representative Ryan Klassy.

The Farm Bureau initiated the Harvest for All program in 2009, after the country’s economy had taken a significant downturn.

“Hunger relief has always been a strong point for the Farm Bureau, and members interested in helping the community wanted to find a way to make an impact on people finding themselves in need of food,” he said.

Farmers and other agribusiness members make a pledge to set aside a percentage of their profits, the proceeds from a specific amount of acreage or the revenue from a certain number of bushels of corn. One farm donates eggs, another gives a portion of his vegetable harvest, and another grows green beans.

“As farmers, we’re in the business of producing food, and this is all about helping people who don’t have enough to eat,” said Kane County Farm Bureau President Joe White at the benefit dinner to celebrate the Farm Bureau’s 100-year anniversary.

Each farmer designates where he wants his contribution to go. The Kane County Corn Growers Association, the Elburn Coop and White, are just a few of the local individuals and organizations that donate to the Elburn Food Bank.

According to Elburn Food Pantry coordinator Rita Burnham, the Food Pantry gets its donations from individuals, organizations’ food drives, churches, local businesses, the Lions Club and others. A good portion of the money the pantry receives comes from the Kane County Farm Bureau.

“The Farm Bureau has been a huge, huge benefit to us,” Burnham said.

Burnham said that the food pantry purchases some of its food from ALDI, milk from Jewel-Osco, and other stores, depending on which ones have the best prices at the time.

Working in conjunction with the Northern Illinois Food Bank, the Farm Bureau is able to stretch its dollars even further to provide meals for those in need. The NIFB, with its access to food donated from grocery stores, as well as its buying power and network, has the ability to turn each dollar into six meals.

Kaneland preschool screening Dec. 13

in Kaneville/Regional by

Aurora—Kaneland School District Special Services will conduct a preschool screening on Friday, Dec. 13, at MorningStar Church in Aurora, for students who may qualify for special education services.

If you reside within the Kaneland School District, and suspect that your child, ages 3-5, has any delays in developmental milestones, then you are encouraged to attend.

This is not a kindergarten screening. In addition, Child and Family Connections will be available, upon request, to screen children from birth to age 3 for suspected developmental delays.

If you have any questions regarding Kaneland’s Early Childhood Services, or you would like to schedule an appointment for a screening, call Stacy Krisch at the Kaneland Special Services Office, (630) 365-5100, ext. 158.

Becoming Dylan’s ‘superhero’

in Regional/Sugar Grove by
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Photo: Tim and Christine (Bateman) Carey with sons Dylan, 3, and Gavin, 6. The family lives in Shabbona, Ill. Photo by Samantha Garver

SUGAR GROVE—Three-year-old Dylan Carey pretends he’s a superhero during his chemotherapy treatments for the stage four neuroblastoma he was diagnosed with in July—and the family hopes that local residents will come out to help save the day for “Super D” at his fundraiser on Friday, Dec. 6.

The event, “Superheroes for Dylan,” will be a night of fun and fundraising. It will be held at Open Range Southwest Grill, located at 1 Golfview Lane in Sugar Grove, and feature a pig roast, cash bar, silent auction, raffle and 50/50 raffle. Doors will open at 5 p.m., and dinner will start at 6 p.m., with hamburgers and hot dogs also available.

Tickets are $20 and include dinner and entertainment. There will be a caricature artist and a holiday photo booth, where guests can have holiday pictures taken by a professional photographer, and “Super D” T-shirts will be for sale.

Back Country Roads, a local country band, will perform from 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. For those coming just to see the band, a $10 cover charge will begin at 8 p.m.

Though the event will be raising funds for his treatment, Dylan won’t be there—he had a bone marrow stem cell transplant on Tuesday, which he needed because the cancer has metastasized from his adrenal gland into his bone marrow. He’ll spend the next 30 days in quarantine at Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago, which means he’ll be in the hospital through Christmas, and then begin radiation treatments.

His mother, Christine Bateman Carey, a 1995 Kaneland graduate and an Elburn native, also won’t be in attendance at the fundraiser—she was in a devastating car accident on Oct. 12 that landed her in the neuro intensive care unit at OSF St. Anthony Medical Center in Rockford, Ill. She’s now undergoing physical, rehabilitative and speech therapies at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Her room at the RIC is just 10 doors down from Becky Nelson’s, the Maple Park native who suffered a traumatic brain injury following a hit-and-run in the Cayman Islands last July.

It’s been a shattering series of events for the Carey family, who live in Shabbona, Ill., and also have a 6-year-old son, Gavin.

“The benefit originally was just for Dylan, but now it’s obviously a family benefit,” said Tracy Rhoades Frieders, who is one of the event’s organizers. “Aside from the enormous things they already had going on, having Chris in the hospital … it’s a lot.”

When Dylan was first diagnosed in July, Chris went on unpaid family medical leave from her job at a CPA office in Geneva in order to care for him.

Dylan underwent surgery to remove the tumor on his adrenal gland and then chemotherapy. Chris took him twice a week to Central DuPage Hospital, which is affiliated with Lurie Children’s Hospital, in Winfield, Ill., for his treatments.

Dylan—a happy little boy who loves superheroes and is affectionately called “Dilly”—is still remarkably active, despite the surgeries and chemotherapy, said Dave Bateman, his grandfather and a former Elburn resident.

“He’s been coping amazingly well; it hasn’t slowed him down much at all,” said Bateman, who now lives in Oregon, Ill. “He’s been a little sick (from the chemotherapy). He was tired for two or three days, and then after that, he’s back to being a typical 3 year old. He’s really doing very well. That’s part of why they call him a superhero, because he’s doing so well with the treatments.”

The car accident on Oct. 12 exacerbated the family’s already difficult situation.

As Tim Carey, Dylan’s father, was driving south on Route 23 in Waterman, Ill., with his wife and two sons in the car, another vehicle failed to stop at a stop sign and collided with the Carey’s vehicle. Both cars overturned into a field. Tim and the boys were treated for minor injuries, but Chris and the other driver were seriously injured.

Tim, who works for the city of West Chicago and is also a volunteer firefighter in Shabbona, also had to go on unpaid family medical leave in order to care for Chris, Dylan and Gavin.

“One incident is tough, but to put both of those together is just overwhelming,” Bateman said. “And I know that the support of the community has just meant the world to Chris and Tim, and after the accident, it’s just meant the world to Tim. It’s been incredible, and it needs to continue, because it’s not a sprint, it’s a marathon. It’s not going to be over by Christmas.”

Tim and Gavin will be spending Christmas at the Ronald McDonald House near Lurie Children’s Hospital, Bateman said, to be near Dylan. Doctors are hoping that Dylan might be well enough on Christmas to spend it in a more “home-like” setting at the Ronald McDonald House with his family, but they want him to stay close to the hospital. Chris’ parents will be spending Christmas at the hospital with her.

“It’s not what you planned on, but we thank God that both Chris and Dylan are still here,” Bateman said. “In the big picture, it’s one of the things we’ve got that we are grateful for.”

Nearly a dozen friends have stepped forward to support the Careys and plan the fundraiser, Frieders said.

Older brother Gavin cut his hair short to support his younger brother, Dylan (left).   Photo by Samantha Garver
Older brother Gavin cut his hair short to support his younger brother, Dylan (left). Photo by Samantha Garver
“(Chris and Tim) would do anything for anybody,” Frieders said. “They’re always willing to help anybody in any way they can. They are people you can count on. They’re just such wonderful people, and anybody who’s met them knows that.”

The organizers are hoping that 300 people will come out on Friday night to help alleviate the family’s financial burden. Frieders said she hopes the silent auction and raffles will help raise money to help pay the Carey’s mounting medical bills.

More than 50 items will be auctioned off, including two pairs of Blackhawks tickets, two pairs of Cubs tickets, a 2014 season pass for Hughes Creek Golf Course in Elburn, a three-night stay at Galena’s Eagle Ridge Resort, $1,000 worth of automotive wet sanding and painting at County Line Customs in Maple Park, an Amazon Kindle, a round of golf for four people at Bliss Creek, a massage package from Massage Envy, a gift certificate to Mario Tricoci, a professional photography package, grass-fed beef from Herrmann Cattle Co., and several sports jerseys, gift baskets, gift certificates, home and holiday items.

Raffle items include a 42-inch flat-screen TV, an iPad Air, gift certificates, Thirty-One purses, tire balancing, and “a ton of other items,” Frieders said.

Frieders said she hopes to raise as much as $30,000 for the Carey family, who she said have been “overwhelmed” by both Dylan’s and Chris’ illnesses.

Though the Careys have health insurance, there are co-pay fees for every doctor visit and every medication. There’s co-insurance, the percentage of hospitalization costs and treatment that the family has to pay. There are travel costs from Shabbona to two different hospitals in Chicago; parking; meals out; and, of course, there’s the lost income of both Chris and Tim.

“There are just a lot of things that aren’t covered,” Bateman said. “There’s the travel, the co-pays, the incidentals, Tim taking time off of work. When you’re on family leave, you’re not paid. And he ran out of paid days a long time ago. All of those things add up, and the bills keep coming. We don’t have any idea how much of it isn’t going to be covered by insurance. So I think there’s going to be a huge need for some financial support to help the kids cross the hurdles.”

Jaime Herrmann, one of the organizers, said that she hoped the holidays would inspire people to be generous to the family.

“These are genuinely nice, kindhearted people who have an unfortunate accident with their son, and a tragic accident, and they can use the open-hearted support of people,” Herrmann said. “This time of year, people tend to be in a giving mood. I can’t think of a more deserving family.”

More information about the Carey family and the benefit can be found at mysuperdylan.com. Monetary donations can also be made to the “Superheroes for Dylan” account at any Castle Bank, including the Sugar Grove branch at 36 E. Galena Blvd.

Hultgren accepting intern applications for spring 2014

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GENEVA—U.S. Representative Randy Hultgren (IL-14) recently announced that he is now accepting applications for spring 2014 semester internships in both his Washington, D.C. and Geneva offices. The position is unpaid and will run approximately from January to May. Academic credit may be available, and schedules can be flexible for those with classes or other obligations. Applicants from the 14th Congressional District are preferred.

“I have spent the last few months gaining valuable Capitol Hill experience while learning vital administrative skills,” said Alex, a current intern. “From learning office procedures and constituent services, to giving tours, to writing constituent response letters and answering their concerns promptly, I’ve honed my understanding of what it takes to run a congressional office effectively while gaining valuable insight into policy and the political process.”

Applicants should be college students or recent graduates, and will assist staff with constituent relations, policy and outreach efforts. Many duties will be administrative in nature, but interns may also be asked to staff Congressman Hultgren at meetings in the district or assist legislative staff in Washington.

Applicants should email a resume, cover letter and writing sample to email.randy@mail.house.gov and specify whether they seek a position for the Geneva or Washington, D.C. office.

Tornado relief dropbox now available at Elburn Community Center

in Elburn/Regional by
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Elburn & Countryside Community Center
525 N. Main St. (Route 47) Elburn
(630) 365-6655 ElburnCCC@gmail.com ElburnCommunityCenter.com

ELBURN—A tornado relief donation dropbox is currently available in the Elburn Herald office, located in the Elburn and Countryside Community Center, 525 N. Main St., Suite 2. Items donated via the dropbox will go toward relief for victims of Sunday’s tornado outbreak, which devastated parts of Central Illinois, as well as parts of Indiana, Wisconsin, Michigan and Missouri.

The dropbox will be available Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Members of the public are encouraged to donate food, clothing and home supplies to the dropbox. Monetary donations may also be made.

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Holiday gift-giving and winter activity guide

in Elburn/Kaneland/Kaneville/Regional/Sugar Grove by
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Hultgren accepting intern applications for spring 2014

in Regional by

GENEVA—U.S. Representative Randy Hultgren (IL-14) recently announced that he is now accepting applications for spring 2014 semester internships in both his Washington, D.C. and Geneva offices. The position is unpaid and will run approximately from January to May. Academic credit may be available, and schedules can be flexible for those with classes or other obligations. Applicants from the 14th Congressional District are preferred.

“I have spent the last few months gaining valuable Capitol Hill experience while learning vital administrative skills,” said Alex, a current intern. “From learning office procedures and constituent services, to giving tours, to writing constituent response letters and answering their concerns promptly, I’ve honed my understanding of what it takes to run a congressional office effectively while gaining valuable insight into policy and the political process.”

Applicants should be college students or recent graduates, and will assist staff with constituent relations, policy and outreach efforts. Many duties will be administrative in nature, but interns may also be asked to staff Congressman Hultgren at meetings in the district or assist legislative staff in Washington.

Applicants should email a resume, cover letter and writing sample to email.randy@mail.house.gov and specify whether they seek a position for the Geneva or Washington, D.C. office.

AU awarded 2014 Military Friendly Schools designation

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AURORA—Aurora University has been named to the coveted Military Friendly Schools list by Victory Media, the premier media entity for military personnel transitioning into civilian life.

The 2014 Military Friendly Schools list honors the top 20 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace America’s military service members, veterans and spouses as students and ensure their success on campus.

The controversy of pet vaccinations

in Health & Wellness/Regional by

ILLINOIS—Vaccinations are a critical component to the preventive care of your companion animal. Your health, as well as your pet’s, depends on it. While this may seem like common knowledge to some, the topic of pet vaccination can be quite controversial, making it a hot topic in veterinary medicine today.

Most veterinary professionals agree that vaccinating your pets is the best way to protect them from various life threatening illnesses.

“Controversy about vaccinating your pet is usually centered around misinformation or the false concept in humans that suggest vaccinations cause autism,” said Dr. Bethany Schilling, Clinical Instructor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences.

Choosing vaccinations specific to your animal’s health and lifestyle should be an informed decision made between you and your veterinarian.

Many pet owners believe that the possible dangers of pet vaccinations outweigh the positive aspects. One risk that worries pet owners is the chance that their pet will have a negative reaction from the vaccination. While this is a viable concern, Schilling and many other veterinarians agree that this occurrence is rare.

“Vaccine reactions are usually non-life threatening, are easily treated, and can typically be prevented in the future,” Schilling said. “Reactions in dogs are typically swelling of the face or hives, and reactions in cats are typically vomiting or diarrhea.”

Vaccines do not guarantee that your pet will not become sick, just like a human getting the flu vaccine can still catch the flu, but it will likely minimize the seriousness of illness in your pet.

Vaccines help build up your pets’ immune system so that their chances of becoming ill when exposed to disease are much lower. They can prevent many upper respiratory diseases in cats such as herpes, calicivirus, and panleukemia, as well as feline leukemia and rabies. There are vaccines to prevent various diseases, such as parvovirus, leptospirosis, Lyme disease, Bordetella and rabies, in dogs as well. Bordetella is found to be one of the causes of “kennel cough,” a highly contagious respiratory disease in dogs.

The two classifications of pet vaccines are core and non-core vaccines.

“Core vaccines are things the entire pet population should be vaccinated against, due to universal risk,” Schilling said. “Non-core vaccines are recommended based on region of the country in which the patient lives and individual patient risk factors, like lifestyle and travel.”

Core vaccines would include vaccines against common diseases, like rabies, whereas vaccines against Lyme disease or kennel cough are among the non-core vaccines. Non-core vaccines are not usually considered necessary, but are available to pets that are at risk for illness due to geographic locations or specific lifestyle needs.

Another debate among many pet owners is whether performing at-home vaccinations on your pet is easier and more efficient than taking them to a veterinary clinic. When making this decision, it is important to keep in mind that vaccines are extremely sensitive to handling. Various factors such as extreme temperatures can inactivate them, and vaccines purchased at a feed store are not guaranteed to be effective.

“Vaccines administered at a vet clinic are handled appropriately and care can be made to make sure the pet is vaccinated at appropriate intervals to ensure protection,” Schilling said. “The pet is examined prior to receiving vaccines each visit to make sure they are healthy.”

Officials celebrate Anderson bridge groundbreaking

in Elburn/Regional by
Dave Anderson, Village President

ELBURN—Decades in the planning, construction is set to begin on the Anderson Road bridge as public officials put shovels in the ground on Monday.

The shovels symbolized breaking ground on the project that will provide an overpass to the Union Pacific Railroad tracks. Officials from all levels of government, from village to federal, gathered at the construction site near the intersection of Anderson Road and Prairie Valley Street in Elburn for Monday’s ceremony.

Kane County Board Chairman Chris Lauzen said reaching this point in the project is the result of hard work, cooperation, collaboration and compromise, along with a heavy dose of federal, county and state funding.

The project will extend Anderson Road, which currently ends at Prairie Valley Street, to Keslinger Road to the south, as well as build the bridge, which will provide an alternate to crossing the railroad tracks on Route 47 through Elburn.

Elburn Village President Dave Anderson, Lauzen, Kane County Board member/Transportation Committee Chair Drew Frasz and Kane County engineer Carl Shoedel were among those who spoke at the event.

State Rep. Kay Hatcher, ShoDeen Inc. president Dave Patzelt, Kaneland School District Superintendent Jeff Schuler and Elburn trustee Bill Grabarek were among those in attendance.

Elburn Village President Dave Anderson said he could remember when there were no bridges over what was then the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. There was just a rickety old bridge over Harley Road, he said.

The progress that the Anderson Road bridge exemplifies is the result of the foresight and cooperation of governmental partners, Anderson said.

Kane County Engineer Carl Shoedel earned a round of applause when he said that, while happy to see this progress, he will be even more excited when the road and the bridge is open to traffic, and the project is completed on time and under budget.

Martam Construction, Inc., together with Herlihy Mid-Continent Company, was awarded its $14.4 million bid on the project, approximately 25 percent less than the engineer’s original project estimate of $19.8 million.

Breaking ground this fall will give it time to freeze and thaw throughout the winter, leaving it ready for construction to begin by spring, Frasz said. He anticipates the project to be completed by late 2014 or early spring 2015.

Frasz said that there was a time in the past year when completion of the project was in question. Patzelt owned the property necessary for the right-of-way for the bridge, and annexation of this land for ShoDeen’s Elburn Station development was a prerequisite to the construction of the bridge.

But Frasz said that in the end, Patzelt and the village were able to come to an agreement on the development. He credited village trustees, and Grabarek in particular, for their careful consideration of the details of the project.

Anderson extolled the positive outcomes that will take place as a result of the bridge, including increased connectivity and accessibility to the Metra station, the industrial park and the downtown area, as well as the safety and welfare of the people within the community.

Anderson said that when the bridge is finished, a bike and pedestrian pathway will provide access to county forest preserves Elburn Woods and Johnson’s Mound.

He reflected that the project had involved generations of elected officials.

“It was all of us,” Anderson said, mentioning the Kane County Board, the Transportation Committee with Frasz’s leadership and Jan Carlson before him, former Elburn Village President Jim Willey, as well as former Speaker of the U.S. House Dennis Hastert, who brought the federal dollars home to Kane County.

“This was started before us,” Anderson said. “We were fortunate enough to be a part of it.”

The build-out of the Elburn Station development will begin once the bridge has been completed.

“The bridge will provide for the efficient movement of traffic, and will be a catalyst for positive development of the entire region,” Anderson said.

Twenty years from now, we’ll be astounded how much activity and how much traffic this bridge will have,” he added.

Photos by Patti Wilk

School bus, car collide in Big Rock

in Regional by

BIG ROCK—Big Rock firefighters and Kane County Sheriff officers on Tuesday morning responded to a collision involving a car and occupied school bus on Route 30, west of Davis Road.

The driver of the bus and vehicle involved were transported to area hospitals with non-life threatening injuries. All nine kids on the bus were released at the scene and transported by a different bus to Big Rock Elementary School.

Ride-In Kane rate increase

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KANE COUNTY—A rate increase of $1, for a total of $4, per ride for the Ride-In Kane program will become effective on Jan. 1, 2014.

The rate increase is necessary in order to continue to deliver the quality Ride-In Kane services, which have been provided to persons with disabilities and the elderly in Kane County since 2008.

For information, call (888) 480-8549.

KC to accept applications for appointment to committee

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KANE COUNTY—Applications from Kane County residents interested in the next available appointment to the Mental Health Advisory Committee for Northern Kane County will be accepted at the Kane County Board Office until 4:30 p.m. on Nov. 1, 2013.

The purpose of the Mental Health Advisory committee is to identify and assess current mental health services in Northern Kane County in its respective jurisdiction, monitor any expansion or contraction of such services, and provide a report to the county board with recommendations for additional services.

Applicants must submit a resume and cover letter to the County Board Office outlining their qualifications and explaining their interest in the position.

Applications can be submitted in person, by mail or fax, or electronically, to Kane County Government Center, 719 Batavia Ave., Building A County Board Office, 3rd Floor, Geneva, Ill. 60134.

Elburn resident involved in crash

in Elburn/Regional by

ELBURN—Two cars were involved in a crash on Route 38 near the Fox Valley Wildlife Center at 6 p.m on Oct. 7, according to the Kane County Sheriff’s Office.

A 17-year-old Elburn resident, Philomena Taglia, was driving a 2003 Ford Taurus west on Route 38. As she was turning left at 45W061 Route 38, she reportedly hit a 2001 Honda CR-V traveling east.

The driver of the Honda was 40-year-old St. Charles resident Timothy Sullivan. There were two children in his car in car seats.

Taglia, Sullivan and his two young passengers were taken to Delnor Community Hospital for evaluation. No one was seriously hurt.

No tickets were issued. Route 38 was closed for about an hour.

Keck announces bid for District 50 in Illinois General Assembly

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ILLINOIS—William F. Keck, CPA and Notre Dame University graduate, is seeking the Republican nomination for Representative of the 50th District in the Illinois General Assembly.

After serving 20 years as Kane County auditor, Keck retired at the completion of his fifth term, in December 2012. He said he is concerned about the “sorry state of affairs in Illinois state government,” and believes that his understanding of government operations can help restore sanity to state government.

Seeking to be a “voice for fiscal responsibility,” Keck has decided to come out of retirement and run for office.

Geneva Potbelly location to donate 25 percent of sales to Blackberry Creek PTO

in Elburn/Kaneland/Regional by
imgres

GENEVA—Potbelly Sandwich Shop, 1530 Commons Drive, in the Geneva Commons, will donate 25 percent of its sales between 4 and 8 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 17, to the Kaneland Blackberry Creek PTO.

Take a break from cooking and enjoy a toasty sandwich, hearty soup or a fresh salad, and help raise funds for a good cause.

MP crash claims life of Cortland resident

in Maple Park/Regional by

MAPLE PARK—A Cortland woman died Monday afternoon as a result of injuries sustained from a car accident in Maple Park.

A preliminary investigation indicates that Shanay Martin, 32, of Cortland, was traveling westbound on Route 38, east of Watson Road, in her Mercury Marquis when she approached a line of cars that were stopped and waiting for a vehicle to turn south onto Watson Road. In an effort to avoid striking the rear of the last car stopped in the line of traffic, Martin crossed over into the oncoming lane of traffic and was struck by a Chevrolet pickup truck traveling eastbound on Route 38.

Martin was later pronounced deceased at Delnor-Community Hospital. The driver of the truck, Benjamin Frerichs, 35, of Maple Park, was treated for non-life-threatening injuries.

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